Brave new world of UBI? - Pembroke Financial IFA's

Brave new world of Universal Basic Income (UBI)?

If those three letters mean nothing to you now, they may do soon. Universal Basic Income – or UBI – is becoming a serious option in radical tax and benefits reform. Do you know what it’s all about? Universal Basic Income (UBI) has become a topic attracting attention among some think-tanks and political parties, both in the UK and overseas. The idea behind UBI is simple and has an obvious electoral appeal. In its most basic form, UBI would give every citizen a government paid regular cash income, subject to the most minimal of qualifications, e.g 18 or over and not imprisoned. Millionaires and paupers, students, full time employees and pensioners would all receive the same amount…

Pension flexibility: too taxing for many - Pembroke Financial IFA's

Pension flexibility: too taxing for many

Lump sum withdrawals under pension flexibility are resulting in over-paid tax due to emergency tax codes. Don’t be caught out. Recent HMRC statistics highlight the over-taxation of some pension benefits. More than one million people have received flexible pension payments thanks to the rules introduced just over four years ago. HMRC’s most recent statistics, to the end of March 2019, show that 1,113,000 people have withdrawn….

Ringing the changes of the new tax year - Pembroke Financial, IFA's

Ringing the changes of the new tax year

The tax year 2018/19 ends on Friday 5 April, which means it’s time to start planning for the new tax year and tie up the loose ends of the old one. Planning for the new tax year is now affected by the shift of the Budget schedule to autumn. The result is that changes announced in October, or in Scotland’s December Budget, have now passed into legislation in time for the new tax year. So, what does 2019/20 hold in store?

Your 2018/2019 tax tables - Pembroke Financial - Brighton IFA's

Your 2019/2020 tax tables

Full of useful information to have at your fingertips for the coming tax year. Please find attached Pembroke’s updated Tax Tables for the 2019/20 tax year. These tables are up-to-date with everything announced in Budget 2018, the Scottish Budget 2019 and subsequent updates, giving you all the key numbers in one place….

Inheritance tax reductions ahead of potential reform - Pembroke Financial

Inheritance tax reductions ahead of potential reform

Future increases to the residence nil rate band might be in question, thanks to the OTS review of inheritance tax. Inheritance tax (IHT) will be slightly reduced for some from 6 April 2019, but greater reforms may well arrive soon. The reduction comes from the IHT residence nil rate band (RNRB) increasing by £25,000, bringing it to £150,000 for the 2019/20 tax year. In theory that means a married couple can pass on up to £950,000 (2 x nil rate band of £325,000 + 2 x RNRB of £150,000) to their heirs free of tax.

Preparing for the new tax year with Pembroke Financial Services

Preparing for the new tax year

Changes to income tax, NICs and pension contributions are coming for 2019/20. One of the few certainties about 2019 is that the new tax rates and thresholds will take effect from the start of the 2019/20 tax year on 6 April and whilst the focus tends to be on year-end tax planning at this time of year, it is important to look forward to the new tax year and the changes that it will bring. From 2019/20 changes will come into effect for key income tax rates and thresholds, as well as pensions.

Unmarried couples lack the rights of married couples

Unmarried couples lack the rights of married couples

Two recent events have shone different lights on the government’s view of unmarried couples. As the graph shows, marriage has been drifting out of fashion for close to 50 years. There are now over 3.3 million unmarried couples in the UK, of which nearly half have children. In spite of this major social change, governments have largely maintained sharp legislative distinctions between the married and unmarried. When they have conflated the two, it is usually to swell the Exchequer’s coffers, for example when applying the high income child benefit charge to unmarried couples with children….

HMRC spotlights IHT returns as a new case shows risks of late planning

HMRC spotlights IHT returns as a new case shows risks of late planning

Imagine you are named as the executor and a beneficiary of your wife’s wealthy aunt. You learn that she is suffering from terminal cancer and has ‘a very impaired lifespan’. What do you do? This is what happened in the case of Nader and others v Revenue & Customs. The executor/beneficiary, a Dr Nader, decided to consult a leading firm of accountants about inheritance tax (IHT) mitigation options for Miss Dickins (the aunt). The accountants put forward an offshore trust-based scheme….

Trick or treat? The Chancellor calls the 2018 Budget for late October

Trick or treat? The Chancellor calls the 2018 Budget for late October

What should we expect from the 2018 Budget? Will the Chancellor turn to inheritance tax, fuel duty, stamp duty, a digital tax or something else to fund the NHS? The 2018 Budget has been set for Monday 29 October, setting a deadline for speculation and proposals. Mr Hammond, however – notwithstanding what his leader said at Conference recently – has indicated that he won’t end the long spell of austerity measures, despite improving public finances….

Record inheritance tax revenues ahead of simplification review

Record inheritance tax revenues ahead of simplification review

As inheritance tax (IHT) receipts hit a record for the Treasury, is it time to review your estate planning ahead of any changes in the Budget? 2017/18 produced record IHT receipts according to HMRC data published in July. The latest release of the annual statistics revealed IHT produced £5.228 billion for the Exchequer in 2017/18. That’s an increase of two thirds over just five years and, as the graph below shows, IHT revenue has been rising rapidly since Treasury receipts hit a low in 2009/10, owing to the combined impacts of the financial crisis and the introduction of the transferable nil rate band…